Philodendron Melanochrysum Care Guide

Today we’re talking about our Philodendron Melanochrysum Care Guide. I’ll cover everything I know about how to care for a Melanochrysum, from growing conditions to propagation. This is all from personal experience and what’s currently working best for me.

The Philodendron Melanochrysum is one of my favorite aroids in the Philodendron family. I’m especially in love with the dark & velvety leaves, and that color change from when a leaf is unfurling to hardening is seriously so gorgeous. Another common name for the P. Melanochrysum is the “Black/Gold Philodendron”. It gets that nickname from her fresh leaves as the color begins with an orange when it unfurls and slowly transitions to a darker green as the leaf hardens off.

Philodendron Melanochrysum Care Guide | How to care for a Philodendron Melanochrysum
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P. Melanochrysum is a surprisingly quick grower as well. Mine which resides in my Ikea Greenhouse Cabinet is constantly pushing new leaves, one after the other. Another reason this aroid is so popular right now is because of its easy care. It’s a great plant for people looking to expand their collection and dip their toes into the more uncommon houseplants.

Read next:
10 Velvety Plants You Need To Own
Know When To Re-pot Your Plant
15 Variegated Plants You Didn’t Know Existed
The Complete Hoya Care Guide

Without further to do, lets get into the Philodendron Melanochrysum Care guide!

I said earlier that I find this plant easy to care for, much like other Philodendrons and Monsteras. We’ll cover lighting, watering, potting soil, fertilizers, humidity, and propagation. I hope that by the end of this article you’ll have gained all the confidence and be more than prepared to take on your own Melanochrysum!

Lighting Requirements

The Philodendron Melanochrysum prefers bright but indirect light. Too harsh of light can scorch the foliage and leave burn marks. They are tolerant to medium and low light settings, and may still grow regularly, although you most likely wont see much development in the plant as she grows. A bright and shaded area is perfect for this Philodendron.

I grow one of my Melanochrysums in an Ikea Greenhouse Cabinet which I mentioned about earlier. It doesn’t receive any natural sunlight, so I heavily depend on grow lights to keep these plants photosynthesizing and growing. It’s important to find the right kind of light for your plants, and its a common misconception that you need to use those standard purple grow lights which are pretty unsightly to me. More often than not you can get away with using normal LED light bulbs, which is what I use for a vast majority of my grow lights. In a perfect world you will want a bulb that produces between 3000 & 5000 lumens, although these can be difficult to find.

I’ll go into grow lights and specs in a different article, because there is a lot more to know than just that when choosing the perfect grow lights for your plants.

Philodendron Melanochrysum Care Guide
My small Melanochrysum growing in my Ikea Greenhouse Cabinet

Watering Needs

So this is pretty standard with most Philodendrons. Water your Melanochrysum only when the top 2 inches of soil has dried out. You can either poke your finger around in the dirt or use a moisture meter to determine how saturated the soil is at the moment.

I’ve found that they are tolerant to drying out between waterings and you won’t get much fuss if you are a day or so late, but definitely do not let the soil get bone-dry. What happens then if their soil is way too dry is that their roots in the soil will dry up with it. Because of that, your Melano will spend more time growing new roots and getting settled in again rather than producing those gorgeous leaves.

Potting Soil Mix

Melanochrysums prefer a chunky and well draining soil mixture. This mix is dependent on who you ask, but for me I like using a 60/20/20. 60% Fox Farms Ocean Forest Soil, 20% added pumice, and 20% added orchid bark. This ensures that the soil will drain water properly and lets oxygen get to the roots.

A well draining soil medium is also important to combat wet feet (root rot). You never want to leave your potted plants sitting in water for too long or having their soil constantly sopping wet. If you run into a situation like this my recommendation is to do an immediate repot into fresh dry soil, but do not water immediately. Wait one day after the repot then give it a good drink, this gives the plant time to properly dry off their roots and avoid further rot.

How I Fertilize

I use the same standard for most of my collection when it comes to fertilization and it seems to go against the grain with what others say. I really only use one brand of plant food, and its Superthrive. I dilute a few drops of it in my watering can before I fill it up and I water all of my plants with this solution. Now the thing is, I do this every single time that I water my plants. When I portion out my Superthrive I lessen the dose by roughly half of the suggested amount.

One of my more mature Melanochrysum. I left a container of water nearby to maintain higher humidity near the plant.

I’ve been following this water & fertilization routine for a year now and my plants are so so so happy about it. Right now during these colder months of the year its expected that plant growth will slow down due to the decrease in light and drops in temperature. I use grow lights as a way to make up for lost sunlight and the Superthrive to keep them getting important nutrients which they have all responded very well with.

Humidity Requirements

It is important to keep your Melanochrysum in at least 60% + humidity. If you can consistently maintain higher humidity that is even better for them. The one living in my Ikea Greenhouse Cabinet rests in about 90% humidity all day long.

Philodendron Melanochrysums are notorious for tearing leaves as they unsheathe and unfurl a new leaf. There is nothing more disappointing then eagerly waiting for a new leaf to come out but it gets stuck at some point and creates rips and holes in the leaf. Plants with velvety leaves have a harder time unfurling smoothly because of the texture, so it is very important to provide extra humidity.

Philodendron Melanochrysum Care Guide | Philodendron Gigas unfurling a new leaf
This is my Philodendron Gigas currently working on unfurling this new leaf.

If you notice a new leaf isn’t unfurling after it gets pushed out then all you need to do is grab a spray bottle with just some water and give that fresh leaf a good spritz. Do that as often throughout your day as you feel you need to, but resist the urge to help it unfurl with your hands. While you may be successful sometimes, its even more disappointing ripping a leaf with your hands when you were just trying to help it unfurl. Patience is key!

Propagation!

I have propagated oh-so many Philodendron Melanochrysums. From air-layering to outright chopping, these plants can handle being propagated well. To take cuttings from your Melanochrysum you’ll want to determine where its nodes are throughout the main stem. Much like other plants, simply cut beneath a node and transition to your desired propagating method.

For me, my go to propagation method is a mix of Sphagnum Moss & Pumice (about 70/30.) I use clear plastic cups which I buy at my local store in packs, and I use a heat stick to burn a number of holes into the bottom to create proper drainage. I like using the small clear cups as pots because it lets me monitor new root growth on my cuttings. I only use the cups when I have a cutting with a leaf attached to it.

For cuttings that do not have a leaf attached, simply just a node, I lay it down on a blanket of moss inside of a plastic tupperware container. This closed container acts as a miniature greenhouse with high humidity, which aroids love. I typically see new roots and growth points within 2-3 weeks of taking the cuttings. Once the node has pushed out at least 2 fresh new leaves in that container, along with a couple roots that should be a few inches long, I then transition the cuttings out of that and into their forever home where they will continue to grow.

I have many Philodendron Melanochrysum nodes growing in this prop box, all in different stages of growth.

It’s so very important to make sure your plants are ready to be moved out of propagation. I rarely ever transition props that haven’t grown any new leaves, or just one leaf. I’d say that isn’t enough time. By the second or third leaf of your new plant, it will be ready to move on. When you pot up cuttings too soon you are putting quite a lot of pressure on a small plant to thrive, and oftentimes leads to more plant stress or risk of it dying entirely because it wasn’t ready to live on its own like that.


I think that about covers everything! If you enjoyed reading this and learned a thing or two from it, it would mean the world to me if you can re-pin this article to your Pinterest Boards! It’s a small favor to ask and it seriously helps us grow the blog so we are able to continue providing these detailed guides to you all for free! Thank you soooo much in advance <3

Philodendron Melanochrysum Care Guide | How to care for a Philodendron Melanochrysum

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Pothos and Philodendrons Care Guide

Pothos and Philodendron Plant Care Guide

Pothos and Philodendrons Care Guide

First of all, at one point in your life, you are destined to obtain either a Pothos or a Philodendron plant. Either gifted or bought, you will own one.

So, what do you do with your Pothos and Philodendrons? How do you take care of them? What variety of them do you have? What does it need to grow, survive, and thrive?

Today we’re going to go over all of that, so keep on reading. We’ll start with what kind of Pothos and Philodendron do you own?

Get ready for a good read today, because we’re going over pretty much everything you need to know about growing your Pothos and Philodendrons!

Just before we get started I have a huge favor to ask; we really put in a lot of time and effort studying up our facts for you, and as a result, we help provide meaningful and imformative posts for you. So, it would mean the world to us if you could pin this post to your boards! Follow our Pinterest for daily tips and inspiration!

Pothos Varieties

Golden Pothos

Golden Pothos

Jessenia Pothos

Jessenia Pothos

Pearls and Jade Pothos

Pearls and Jade Pothos

Marble Queen Pothos

Marble Queen Pothos

Neon Pothos

Neon Pothos

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Manjula Pothos

Manjula Pothos

Satin Pothos

Satin Pothos

Glacier Pothos

Glacier Pothos

Jade Pothos

Pothos and Philodendrons Care Guide

Philodendron Varieties

Brandi Philodendron

Brandi Philodendron

Brasil Philodendron

Brasil Philodendron

Green Congo Philodendron


Green Heartleaf Philodendron

Green Heartleaf Philodendron

Mini Split-Leaf Philodendron

Mini Split-Leaf Philodendron

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Moonlight Philodendron


Philodendron Grazielae

Philodendron Grazielae

Prince of Orange Philodendron

Prince of Orange Philodendron

Selloum Philodendron


Xanadu Philodendron


Furthermore, it should also be noted that there are hundreds of variegations of both Pothos and Philodendrons, I included only 10 of each because they are the most likely ones that you may have.

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Now that you have identified what variegation you possess, how do you take care of them?

Read also:

Pothos and Philodendron Care

Although Pothos and Philodendrons are different plant species from completely different families, they do share a lot of the same needs for care.

Light

Both Pothos and Philodendrons prefer bright, but indirect sunlight. Placing your plants in direct sun can cause their leaves to brown or burn, which you don’t want of course. Both can also tolerate low light areas, but if you want to see some serious growth, then put them where they can receive lots of indirect sunlight.

Water

First of all, this goes without saying that for many houseplants, and I’m sure you’ve heard it before; the common killer for many houseplants is loving them too much and giving them too much water. There’s really no set schedule for when to water them, you have to tell by how damp their soil is.

So, stick your finger at least 2 inches into their soil, if you feel moisture, leave them alone. If the soil is dry, then water the plants thoroughly until water is dripping from the drainage hole of the pot (and make sure it completely finishes dripping, or else you put your plant at risk of getting root rot).

Also, a trick I learned (maybe not a trick, just something I’ve caught on to), is that the smaller pot you have your plant living in, then the more likely you will need to water it. Simply because smaller pots can’t retain as much soil, which can’t retain as much water.

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Propagation

I propagate every single plant I own. Propagating is the easiest way to obtain a very large number of plants for free. Who doesn’t love free plants? Therefore you get an unlimited supply of free plants, from buying only one.

Typically, I propagate my plants once their vines start getting a little out of control or messy.

But just how do you propagate Pothos and Philodendrons though? It is extremely easy honestly. It’s the same technique for both plants which makes it even easier to learn.

What you’ll need to start propagating:

  1. Good pair of pruning shears
  2. Mason jars to hold cuttings
  3. Rooting hormone to boost growth rate for roots

The steps to a successful Pothos and Philodendron propagation:

  1. First of all, it is vitally important that you use sterile shears or scissors to cut stems from your plants. As a result, you can potentially introduce infection to plants by not sterilizing. So, how do you sterilize shears? Soak them into a disinfectant, rinse off with water, and dry with a clean towel.
  2. Next, cut beneath the node of the stem. The node is essentially where the leaf starts shooting out of the main stem. Most note-worthy, you will want to cut just under about 1-2 inches.
  3. After you have your cuttings, you can then either stick them in a jar of water or damp soil for them to begin growing roots. Also, I personally always put them into the water because I can see the roots growing and I know when to pull them to plant to soil.
  4. Finally, in 3-4 weeks of your cuttings in water or soil, you should expect to see roots formed on them. If you root them in water as I do, wait until the roots are at least 2 inches long before you pull them to plant them into the soil.

And wallah! You have a completely new plant!

So, I especially love propagating my Pothos and Philodendrons because of how simple it is and how quick of growers they are once rooted. Above all, once you have a lush new plant, you can gift it to a friend! (in turn, they come to this article because they’ve somehow obtained one of these as I mentioned earlier).

Pothos and Philodendron Pests

With the proper care and attention, you shouldn’t have to worry about dealing with pests and bugs on your plants all that often, but, people are human and sometimes it’s just out of our control.

Some pests to watch out for on your plants include: mealybugs, scales, spider mites, and aphids. The best way to deal with them is taking steps to prevent them before they even get to your plants.

But if you’re reading this because you already have them and need to deal with them ASAP, then here’s what I do with my plants to keep them happy:

  1. When you come around to repotting plants into new soil, check the roots of the plants to make sure you aren’t bringing any new critters with it into its new home.
  2. If you have mealybugs or fungus gnats in your soil, what I do is pour a mix of 1 part hydrogen peroxide & 2 part water into my soil and completely rinse it thoroughly, this not only kills the bugs inside but it provides good nutrients to your plant’s roots that they will be very happy about having.
  3. Next, to deal with fungus gnats, I try to dry out the soil in my plants for as long as they will withstand to help kill any larvae lingering in the soil. (also, I’ve heard that nematodes do a wonderful job with eliminating them and bacteria in the soil, but don’t put them in there if you’ve already done the hydrogen peroxide method!)
  4. And finally, I like to wipe down all of the leaves on my bigger plants with a soap and water washcloth, as a result, that not only opens the pores on the leaves to allow them to photosynthesize but kills any bacteria lingering on them.

Furthermore, I personally try to avoid using any sort of name brand insecticide just because I’m extremely worried that my plants might react harshly to it, so, to the best of my ability, I stick to home-brewed options that I know what is in it that I’m giving to my plants.

And there you have it, friends! Happy growing!

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Pothos and Philodendrons Care Guide

Well, that is about all we have for you today. If you have any unanswered questions, please comment them below! We will tell you everything you need to know about your Pothos and Philodendron!

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